Ägyptologie-Blatt

[ Home | Forum ]

« vorheriger Artikel | nächster Artikel »
Grab Alexander des Großen gefunden ?
Polish Center of Archaeology meldet den Fund in Kom el-Dikka, im Zentrum Alexandrias.
Von Lutz am 30.04.2014 um 17:22:24 

Egypt: Archaeologist Could Have Discovered the Tomb of Alexander the Great (New World Order Media, April 29th, 2014)

Egypt: Archaeologist May Have Discovered Tomb of Alexander the Great (Greek World Reporter, Nikoleta Kalmouki, Apr 30, 2014)

Zitat:
"... A team of archaeologists and historians from the Polish Center of Archaeology have revealed a mausoleum made of marble and gold that might be the tomb of Alexander the Great. The site is situated in an area known as Kom el-Dikka in the heart of downtown Alexandria, only 60 meters away from the Mosque of Nebi Daniel.

The monument was apparently sealed off and hidden in the 3rd or 4th century AD, to protect it from the christian repression and destruction of pagan monuments after the change of the official religion within the Roman Empire. It is a testimony to the multicultural nature of Alexander’s empire, as it combines artistic and architectural influences from Greek, Egyptian, Macedonian and Persian cultures. The inscriptions are mainly in Greek  but there are also a few Egyptian hieroglyphs, mentioning that the mausoleum is dedicated to the “King of Kings, and Conqueror of the World, Alexander III.”  The finding is extremely important as it can provide new information about Alexander the Great. ..."

versenden | drucken


Suchen | Schlagzeilen | RSS



Kommentare zu diesem Artikel
Sinuhe2001.05.2014 um 11:25:14
, schöne Story, aber die Newsquelle ist nicht ernst zu nehmen: World News Daily Report is an American Jewish Zionist newspaper based in Tel Aviv and dedicated on covering biblical archeology news and other mysteries around the Globe.

Our News Team is composed of award winning christian, muslim and jewish journalists, retired Mossad agents and veterans of the Israeli Armed Forces.


Lutz01.05.2014 um 14:30:57
Schade eigentlich ... Aber da weder das Polish Centre of Mediterranean Archaeology noch die einschlägigen ägyptischen Medien die Meldung bestätigen, gehört sie wohl in den Bereich Satire.



Eigenen Kommentar abgeben
Name:
eMail:   verstecken
SID:
Zeitlich beschränkte Gast-Schreibberechtigung mit eMail-Authentifizierung.
Kommentar: