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   Nicholas Reeves : The Burial of Nefertiti? (2015) (104)
  Autor/in  Thema: Nicholas Reeves : The Burial of Nefertiti? (2015)
Horemheb  maennlich
Member

  

Re: Nicholas Reeves : The Burial of Nefertiti? (2015) 
« Antwort #30, Datum: 16.10.2015 um 09:07:22 »   

Auch ein Beitrag von Frank Müller-Römer zum Thema:
Kritische Anmerkungen
> Antwort auf Beitrag vom: 16.10.2015 um 00:56:16  Gehe zu Beitrag
Lutz  maennlich
Member - Themenstarter

  

Re: Nicholas Reeves : The Burial of Nefertiti? (2015) 
« Antwort #31, Datum: 05.11.2015 um 12:20:28 »   

Zur Abwechslung mal was für`s Auge ...  

Für die Ausstellung "The Discovery of King Tut" (New York, ab 21.11.2015) hat die Firma "Dynamichrome" eine Auswahl der Original Fotos von Harry Burton digital reconstruiert und farblich bearbeitet. Durchaus gelungen, wie ich finde ...

"Nov. 4, 1922  The Discovery of Tutankhamun, in Color".

Gruß, Lutz.
> Antwort auf Beitrag vom: 16.10.2015 um 09:07:22  Gehe zu Beitrag
Lutz  maennlich
Member - Themenstarter

  

Re: Nicholas Reeves : The Burial of Nefertiti? (2015) 
« Antwort #32, Datum: 06.11.2015 um 20:21:32 »   

"Arab Republic of Egypt - Ministry of Antiquities (via Facebook)" :

Zitat:
Arab Republic of Egypt
Ministry of Antiquities
Press Office
November 6, 2015

The Ministry of Antiquities, Faculty of Engineering – Cairo
University and Heritage, innovation and preservation (HIP)
Institute - Paris joint scientific mission started the first
experiment using infrared thermography to detect the
temperature of the Tutankhamun walls, the experiment lasted
for 24 hours stated Dr. Eldamaty, Minster of Antiquities.

The preliminary analysis, added Eldamaty, indicates the
presence of an area different in its temperature than the
other parts of the northern wall.
In order to certify the
results, Eldamaty said, a number of experiments will be
carried out  to determine more accurately the area marking
the difference in temperature. A study of the acquired
results will be analyzed as well.

Eldamaty further added that a longer time is needed (one
week or more) using the thermography technique in order
to confirm the results.
Possibility of using other methods is being studied in the
mean time to help identify the area different in temperature.

(c) Ministry of Antiquities, Press Office
Wrote: Gehad Elrawy
Translated by: Eman Hossni

Gruß, Lutz.
> Antwort auf Beitrag vom: 05.11.2015 um 12:20:28  Gehe zu Beitrag
Sinuhe20  maennlich
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Re: Nicholas Reeves : The Burial of Nefertiti? (2015) 
« Antwort #33, Datum: 10.11.2015 um 15:56:46 »   

Jetzt auch in den deutschen Medien:

http://www.spiegel.de/wissenschaft/mensch/nofretete-waermemessung-naehrt-glauben-an-grab-hinter-tutanchamum-kammer-a-1062030.html

Viele Grüße
Sinuhe20
> Antwort auf Beitrag vom: 06.11.2015 um 20:21:32  Gehe zu Beitrag
Lutz  maennlich
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Re: Nicholas Reeves : The Burial of Nefertiti? (2015) 
« Antwort #34, Datum: 23.11.2015 um 18:38:49 »   

"Search for Nefertiti in Tutankhamun's Tomb to Start Thursday" (Ahram Online - Nevine El-Aref, Mo: 23.11.2015)

Zitat:
"The three-day operation will involve the use of non-invasive radar to search behind the walls of Tutankhamun's burial chamber ...

... Minister of Antiquities Mamdouh Eldamaty told Ahram Online that the work is to be carried out over three days, and will involve the use of radar signals and infrared thermography to probe the north and west walls of the boy-king's burial chamber. ..."

Laut "Daily Mail" sollen die Ergebnisse bereits am Samstag "in Luxor on November 28" im Rahmen einer Pressekonferenz der Öffentlichkeit vorgestellt werden.

Gruß, Lutz.
« Letzte Änderung: 23.11.2015 um 18:49:30 von Lutz »
> Antwort auf Beitrag vom: 10.11.2015 um 15:56:46  Gehe zu Beitrag
Lutz  maennlich
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Re: Nicholas Reeves : The Burial of Nefertiti? (2015) 
« Antwort #35, Datum: 27.11.2015 um 16:46:39 »   

"Radar Test Underway Before Search for Nefertiti in Tomb of Tutankhamun" (Ahram Online - Nevine El-Aref, Thursday 26 Nov 2015)

Zitat:
"The Ministry of Antiquities is carrying out a trial-run on the walls of KV5 to test the accuracy of the Japanese radar before using it inside Tutankhamun's tomb ...

...  The search team, which includes Egyptian and Japanese radar experts, is using the tomb of King Ramses II's sons (KV5) to test the radar’s accuracy before going through with the scanning of the north and west walls of King Tutankhamun's burial chamber.

Eldamaty told Ahram Online that the KV5 tomb was chosen because of its maze of corridors and chambers, the contents of which are already known. Some chambers of KV5 are filled with sand, while others are empty or contain solid walls.

"Thank God all the results given by the radar are correct," asserted Eldamaty, adding that tonight the radar will be set up in Tutankhamun's burial chamber to conduct the main search."


Und ein "Augenzeuge" vor Ort in Luxor, auf seinem Blog :

"Tutankhamun Tomb KV62 – Radar" (Bernard M. Adams, 26/11/2015)

Zitat:
"... I spoke to Dr. Nicholas Reeves who told me that the radar would be used at 5-pm tonight when it is quiet and cooler. They want to keep the tomb open during the day for tourists. In the meantime, the radar went into Ramesses II tomb KV5 for what they say is a test run. I believe it also gave them some free radar time to look for any anomalies in there. ..."

"Radar Survey Underway at Tutankhamun's Tomb in Luxor" (Ahram Online - Nevine El-Aref in Luxor, Friday 27 Nov 2015)

Zitat:
"... The first radar tests were carried out on Thursday on the north, west and south walls of King Tutankhamun's burial chamber; the second radar investigation is due to take place on Friday afternoon and will take readings of the same walls to confirm the data. ...

...  Reeves describes the data collected by the radar on the walls as "intriguing" but nothing can be confirmed yet until the data has been analysed scientifically and archaeologically.

He did say however that the data reveals a high probability of differences in the wall's design.

On Saturday an international press conference is to be held at Howard Cater's rest house on Luxor's West Bank to announce the final result of the radar survey."

Gruß, Lutz.
« Letzte Änderung: 27.11.2015 um 17:13:27 von Lutz »
> Antwort auf Beitrag vom: 23.11.2015 um 18:38:49  Gehe zu Beitrag
Sinuhe20  maennlich
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Re: Nicholas Reeves : The Burial of Nefertiti? (2015) 
« Antwort #36, Datum: 27.11.2015 um 21:11:29 »   

Noch etwas anderes:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/archaeology/king-tutankhamun-new-evidence-suggests-ancient-egyptian-gold-death-mask-was-made-for-heretic-queen-a6751776.html

Viele Grüße
Sinuhe20
> Antwort auf Beitrag vom: 27.11.2015 um 16:46:39  Gehe zu Beitrag
Lutz  maennlich
Member - Themenstarter

  

Re: Nicholas Reeves : The Burial of Nefertiti? (2015) 
« Antwort #37, Datum: 28.11.2015 um 13:56:32 »   

"Radar Scans in King Tut’s Tomb Suggest Hidden Chambers" (National Geographic - Peter Hessler, PUBLISHED Sat Nov 28 04:13:25 EST 2015)

Zitat:
"After two nights of tests in the Valley of the Kings, new evidence reinforces the theory that undiscovered rooms may lie behind the painted walls.

LUXOR, Egypt—After two days of radar scans in the tomb of Tutankhamun, archaeologists have concluded that preliminary examination of the data provides evidence that unopened sections lie behind two hidden doorways in the pharaoh’s underground burial chamber.

The results, announced Saturday morning at a news conference in Luxor, bolster the theory of Nicholas Reeves, a British archaeologist who believes that the tomb contains another royal burial. The hidden tomb, he has speculated, belongs to Nefertiti, King Tut’s mother-in-law, who may have ruled as a female pharaoh during Egypt’s 18th Dynasty. If so, this would be only the second intact royal burial site to be discovered in modern times—and it would, in the words of Mamdouh Eldamaty, the Egyptian antiquities minister, represent “one of the most important finds of the century.” At the press conference, he said he was “90 percent positive” that another chamber lies behind the north wall of the tomb.

On Friday, Eldamaty stood next to that wall, which is painted with a scene depicting the burial rituals of the boy pharaoh, who ruled in the 14th century B.C. “The radar scan tells us that on this side of the north wall, we have two different materials,” he said. “We believe that there could be another chamber.”

The scans—conducted by Hirokatsu Watanabe, a Japanese radar specialist— also provide evidence of a second hidden doorway in the adjoining west wall.


Together these features lend credence to Reeves’s theory, which he made public in July. Since then examinations of the physical features of the burial chamber have added support. But until the tests began on Thursday, the evidence ran no deeper than the surface of the walls. Radar scans had never previously been conducted in the tomb, and they represent a crucial step in the investigation. For the first time, specialists have collected data about both the material structure of the walls and the open spaces behind them. It’s these spaces that are most intriguing—they could contain artifacts and possibly even burial goods that rival those found with Tutankhamun.

“Everything is adding up,” Reeves, a National Geographic grantee, told me on Thursday evening, immediately after a suspenseful examination with the radar. We were standing next to the north wall, whose painted scene has been visible since 1922, when Howard Carter rediscovered the tomb. But after observing the scans, I found that the wall looked different to me—I couldn’t help but imagine what may lie beyond. “The tomb is not giving up its secrets easily,” Reeves continued. “But it is giving them up, bit by bit. It’s another result. And nothing is contradicting the basic direction of the theory.” ...

... The work started at midday with a test scan in a nearby tomb called KV5, where Watanabe used the machine to examine walls with known features behind them. Within half an hour, he was drenched in sweat—the deeper reaches of tombs in Luxor are hot and airless. But the results showed the machine was working well, as did a second test run along another wall that is already known to have a room behind it, this time in the tomb of Tutankhamun.

By 7 o’clock, Watanabe seemed re-energized, and he was ready to scan the west wall of the burial chamber, which Reeves believes contains a blocked-in doorway. There were around two dozen people in the tomb: Eldamaty, Reeves, Abbas Mohamed, an Egyptian professor of applied and environmental geophysics, a couple of journalists from the Egyptian state press, and film crews from National Geographic and Tokyo Broadcasting System Television. (The investigation—supported, in part, by the National Geographic Society—is being documented for a National Geographic Channel special to premiere globally in 2016.) ...

... Slowly, Watanabe began to push the trolley at a distance of five to seven centimeters from the wall, watching a computer screen that was perched on top. The room was completely silent. I had the feeling that I was watching some strange performance art: All the attention in the room, and around ten cameras, were aimed at Watanabe, who moved with excruciating slowness, like an elderly man struggling to push a cart in a supermarket.

After going halfway, he aborted. He fiddled with the machine for a moment, and then he called out in Japanese, “Can I have a piece of string?” Someone scurried off to get a rope. ...

... After the aborted scan, Watanabe tinkered with the radar machine and decided that he didn’t need the string after all. The room hushed, and he began to push the cart along the wall once more. After moving a little more than half of the distance, he broke the silence: “They changed the material here.”

This was exactly the point at which there seemed to be a doorway on the Factum Arte scans.
Watanabe is not an Egyptologist, and he had not studied Reeves’s ideas closely, but what he observed on the radar matched up. He did one more scan of the west wall, and then he proceeded to the north. “It’s just a solid wall,” he called out, at the beginning. He reached the section of the wall that Reeves had proposed was a blocked-over partition. “There is a change from here,” Watanabe announced.

After he was finished, he studied the multicolored bars that ran across the computer screen. “Obviously it’s an entrance to something,” he said through a translator. “It’s very obvious that this is something.  It’s very deep.”

He scanned the wall again and confirmed the initial reading. Reeves asked him if he wanted to do another round. “I don’t need to,” Watanabe said. “It’s good data.” ..."


"Revealed: King Tut's tomb has more rooms to explore" (Luxor Times, 28.11.2015)

Video Pressekonferenz : "Revealing the results of King tut's tomb walls scan".

Gruß, Lutz.
> Antwort auf Beitrag vom: 27.11.2015 um 21:11:29  Gehe zu Beitrag
Lutz  maennlich
Member - Themenstarter

  

Re: Nicholas Reeves : The Burial of Nefertiti? (2015) 
« Antwort #38, Datum: 29.11.2015 um 01:47:03 »   

Und einige Berichte / Kommentare aus der deutschsprachigen Presse ...

"Hochspannung in Luxor : Auf der Suche nach Königin Nofretete" (Kurier Wien, 28.11.2015)

"Grab des Tutanchamun : Ägypten rechnet mit neuen Kammern" (Lübecker Nachrichten, 28.11.2015)

"Wahrscheinlich weitere Kammern in Tutanchamuns Grab" (DIE WELT, 28.11.2015)

"Wird das Geheimnis hinter der Bilderwand gelüftet?" (ZEIT ONLINE, 28.11.2015)

Gruß, Lutz.
« Letzte Änderung: 29.11.2015 um 08:48:07 von Lutz »
> Antwort auf Beitrag vom: 28.11.2015 um 13:56:32  Gehe zu Beitrag
Sinuhe20  maennlich
Member

  

Re: Nicholas Reeves : The Burial of Nefertiti? (2015) 
« Antwort #39, Datum: 29.11.2015 um 13:02:48 »   

Diesen Artikel fand ich auch noch ganz gut:

"Tutanchamun-Grab: Hinweise auf verborgene Kammern gefunden" (Spektrum.de, 28.11.2015)

Viele Grüße
Sinuhe20
> Antwort auf Beitrag vom: 29.11.2015 um 01:47:03  Gehe zu Beitrag
Iufaa  maennlich
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Re: Nicholas Reeves : The Burial of Nefertiti? (2015) 
« Antwort #40, Datum: 29.11.2015 um 13:17:38 »   

Hier schießt die Erwartung wieder mal über das hinaus, was man bis jetzt weiß:

- die Radaruntersuchungen können nur Hohlräume lokalisieren, und

- definierte Übergänge von gewachsenem Fels zu Mauern.

Die bisher bekannten Befunden schließen nicht aus, dass zur Grablege von Tut ein "in Arbeit befindlicher Gang" durch eine Mauer abgetrennt wurde - von Raum oder Räumen kann man er sprechen, wenn man hinter der Wand nachgesehen hat.
> Antwort auf Beitrag vom: 29.11.2015 um 13:02:48  Gehe zu Beitrag
Lutz  maennlich
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Re: Nicholas Reeves : The Burial of Nefertiti? (2015) 
« Antwort #41, Datum: 29.11.2015 um 17:28:33 »   


Zitat:
Iufaa : ... Die bisher bekannten Befunde schließen nicht aus, dass zur Grablege von Tut ein "in Arbeit befindlicher Gang" durch eine Mauer abgetrennt wurde ...

Das würde ich nicht sagen. Im Gegenteil, die "bisher bekannten Befunde", also vergleichbare bauliche Zustände in diversen Gräbern im Tal der Könige (und Ägypten allgemein ??) sprechen gegen eine solche Vorgehensweise. Mir ist kein Grab bekannt in welchem auf diese Art mit unfertigen Räumen verfahren wurde.

Gruß, Lutz.
> Antwort auf Beitrag vom: 29.11.2015 um 13:17:38  Gehe zu Beitrag
Iufaa  maennlich
Moderator

  

Re: Nicholas Reeves : The Burial of Nefertiti? (2015) 
« Antwort #42, Datum: 29.11.2015 um 18:07:28 »   

Tuts Grablege war wohl eine Notfallmassnahme, das eigene Grab und seine Ausstattung nicht fertig, da muss man mit ungewöhnlichen Vorgehensweisen rechnen. Und für  eine solche königliche Grabstätte wirst Du im TdK wohl wenig Vergleichbares finden.
Ansonsten lassen die Radaruntersuchungen keine Aussagen über die Tiefe der Hohlräume zu, nicht umsonst hat man in KV5 "Eichmessungen" gemacht.

Also, weniger Hype und freuen, wenn was hinter den Wänden gefunden wird.
> Antwort auf Beitrag vom: 29.11.2015 um 17:28:33  Gehe zu Beitrag
Lutz  maennlich
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Re: Nicholas Reeves : The Burial of Nefertiti? (2015) 
« Antwort #43, Datum: 29.11.2015 um 18:26:44 »   


Zitat:
Iufaa : ... Tuts Grablege war wohl eine Notfallmassnahme, das eigene Grab und seine Ausstattung nicht fertig, da muss man mit ungewöhnlichen Vorgehensweisen rechnen. Und für  eine solche königliche Grabstätte wirst Du im TdK wohl wenig Vergleichbares finden. ...

Was nichts daran ändert das es sich um das Grab eines Königs handelt das rituell durchaus den üblichen Vorschriften folgt bzw. letzteres zumindest, unter den gegebenen Voraussetzungen, versucht wurde.

Und mit Blick auf die wohl unübersehbare Enge in der die Masse an Beigaben gestapelt wurde kann ich mir nun beim besten Willen nicht vorstellen das freiwillig und gegen jede Gepflogenheit / Notwendigkeit auf zusätzlichen Stellplatz / Lagerraum verzichtet wurde.

Gruß, Lutz.

P.S.: Zu "wenig vergleichbares im TdK" siehe KV 15 - Sety II : unfertig jedoch mit "open end", rituell notwendige Beigaben wohl nur als Wandmalerei vorhanden.
« Letzte Änderung: 01.12.2015 um 05:59:35 von Lutz »
> Antwort auf Beitrag vom: 29.11.2015 um 18:07:28  Gehe zu Beitrag
Sen-nefer  maennlich
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Re: Nicholas Reeves : The Burial of Nefertiti? (2015) 
« Antwort #44, Datum: 29.11.2015 um 22:28:41 »   

Ich möchte jetzt nicht in der Haut derjenigen stecken die entscheiden müssen ob die Malerei in situ zerstören wird oder nicht.
Es kann sich hinter der Unregelmäßigkeit in der Wand von einem "Loch" bis zum ominösen Grab alles befinden.  Aber wir werden es hoffentlich demnächst erfahren.

Gruß

Sen-nefer
> Antwort auf Beitrag vom: 29.11.2015 um 18:26:44  Gehe zu Beitrag
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